Environmental Impact Statement for Raising Clarrie Hall Dam

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link


About

Council consultants Eco Logical Australia have begun work to prepare the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed raising of Clarrie Hall Dam.

The EIS is expected to be completed by February 2021 and will be placed on exhibition for public comment around March 2021.

The EIS must be exhibited for a minimum of 28 days.

During that period, the community and other stakeholders are invited to make submissions on the EIS. These submissions must be considered by the Consultant and a formal Response to Submissions prepared.

Given that this project has been accepted as a State Significant Infrastructure (SSI) project, the Department of Planning Industry and Environment (DPIE) advertises the exhibition period in both a statewide and local newspaper and places electronic copies of the document on its Major Projects Website.

Submissions on the document will be able to be made in one of four ways:

  • Online
    • via the relevant application form on the Dept PIE’s Major Projects website
    • via this Your Say Tweed site
  • In writing:
    • to the department
    • to Tweed Shire Council.

To assist the community and stakeholders to make submissions on this EIS for this project, Council and its Consultant were to hold up to two public meetings to help unpack the document. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, public meetings may no longer be possible. Council and its Consultant are considering alternate ways of engaging the community. The dates of these future engagements - whether by virtual meetings or other means - will be advertised on this site, plus in the Tweed Link publication printed in the Tweed Valley Weekly and Gold Coast Bulletin every week.

If you are interested in this project and want to review the EIS and possibly make a submission on its content, please register to Stay Informed by clicking the tab at the top right-hand of this page. This will enable Council to email you direct when the EIS goes on public exhibition and when the public meeting / s are scheduled.

Read more about the project …


About

Council consultants Eco Logical Australia have begun work to prepare the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed raising of Clarrie Hall Dam.

The EIS is expected to be completed by February 2021 and will be placed on exhibition for public comment around March 2021.

The EIS must be exhibited for a minimum of 28 days.

During that period, the community and other stakeholders are invited to make submissions on the EIS. These submissions must be considered by the Consultant and a formal Response to Submissions prepared.

Given that this project has been accepted as a State Significant Infrastructure (SSI) project, the Department of Planning Industry and Environment (DPIE) advertises the exhibition period in both a statewide and local newspaper and places electronic copies of the document on its Major Projects Website.

Submissions on the document will be able to be made in one of four ways:

  • Online
    • via the relevant application form on the Dept PIE’s Major Projects website
    • via this Your Say Tweed site
  • In writing:
    • to the department
    • to Tweed Shire Council.

To assist the community and stakeholders to make submissions on this EIS for this project, Council and its Consultant were to hold up to two public meetings to help unpack the document. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, public meetings may no longer be possible. Council and its Consultant are considering alternate ways of engaging the community. The dates of these future engagements - whether by virtual meetings or other means - will be advertised on this site, plus in the Tweed Link publication printed in the Tweed Valley Weekly and Gold Coast Bulletin every week.

If you are interested in this project and want to review the EIS and possibly make a submission on its content, please register to Stay Informed by clicking the tab at the top right-hand of this page. This will enable Council to email you direct when the EIS goes on public exhibition and when the public meeting / s are scheduled.

Read more about the project …

Q&A

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Hi, I’m wondering how the raising of the wall will affect residents downstream for flood insurance? Also what steps are being taken to strengthen the wall so movement doesn’t happen to the extent it has so far?

    Another Concerned resident Asked 3 months ago

    There has been no movement of the wall since its construction. 

    The raised dam will be of a similar structural integrity and the raised wall will not move.  The raising of the wall will not increase risk to downstream properties.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Why is all of this taking so long? I mean this has been talked about since at least 2016, we are now 4 years on nothing. I am so very concern that DPI still shows that Twedd is in drought, we need our water urgently.

    Mazza Asked 18 days ago

    Typically the raising of a dam, from a decision to do it to completion takes about 10 years.  The 10 years comes from requirements to:

    • Undertake preliminary studies to ensure there are no issues preventing the project and identify issues that need to be considered in the concept design (quarry sites, road diversions, land acquisitions etc)
    • Prepare a concept design (flood hydrology, seismic studies, geotechnical investigations etc)
    • Undertake an Environmental Impact Statement in accordance with requirements set out by the State Government
    • When the EIS is complete a detailed design, taking into consideration the conditions of approval, needs to be undertaken
    • After detailed design, tendering and construction
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Hi, I have been looking at the information provided on potential impacts of this project and wanted to ask if consideration has been given to the increase in prodction of methy mercury from the flooding of vegetation and soils as the water level is raised. This is a signifcant issue in Canada with flooded reservoirs that has led to bioaccumulation of mercury in aquatic species, particularly higher trophic level fish that may be consumed by people. Thank you for your consideration of my question. Regards Charity

    Charity Asked over 1 year ago

    There is no known source of methyl mercury in the catchment of Clarrie Hall Dam.  The soils in the catchment area have never been tested for methyl mercury and it has never been raised as a concern.  Council has referred your question to a number of experts and none of them could provide comment on methyl mercury being an issue.  

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Obviously I am aware that what I am about to ask here will in no way be a priority for the Council for this project and my expectation is that the answer will be that it is not on the radar at all. But...is there any opportunity here at all to build or allow to be built public use nature trails? What I have in mind here is a trail that skirts the entire circumference of the dam. This area is a fantastic natural resource and I believe it should be made available in ways for the community to enjoy. For example, the Hinze dam just up the road has a number of mountain bike trails that are free to enjoy. Thanks for your time.

    Warwick Asked 6 months ago

    Council is to develop a master plan for the catchment lands in Council ownership.  The primary purpose of the catchment is to maintain water quality in the dam.  Notwithstanding there are a range of activities that could be undertaken in the catchment that would not impact on water quality.  These include things like walking trails/nature walks.

    At this stage we are mapping the features within the land Council owns so we can determine how best to develop the catchment to provide amenity and recreational opportunities to the public.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    why hasn't the new dam been started that the weed Shire bought the land for many years ago we need more water storage in the Tweed our population is rising fast. We have just seen the water shortage devastation so now is the time for that new dam to be built ready for the next drought that will happen and it will.

    ronbar Asked 7 months ago

    In 2009/2010 Council engaged consultants MWH to prepare a series of reports to inform a Community Working Group and assist Council in determining a preferred option for the augmentation of the Tweed District Water Supply.

    In 2014 there were reviews of:

    ·  Secure yields based on 1 degree warming by 2030;

    ·  Demand projections;

    ·  Options; and

    ·  Costs.

    The reviews indicated the need for an augmented water supply by 2026.

    Based on the information available, on 10 December 2015, Council resolved in part:

    1.  Based on the information currently available, Council adopts the raising of the wall of the Clarrie Hall Dam as the preferred option for future water security and proceeds with the planning approval and land acquisitions phase for the project.

    Council has been proceeding with the implementation of this Resolution. 

    Council has now engaged Eco Logical Australia to prepare the Environmental Impact Statement for raising Clarrie Hall Dam.  The EIS is due to be completed by the end of this year.

    Raising Clarrie Hall Dam by 8.5 metres as proposed, the secure yield of the dam will treble, ensuring sufficient water for the Tweed until about 2046.

    The alternative of building a dam at Byrrill Creek would have cost more and would not have provided such longevity.