Raising Clarrie Hall Dam

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Council is undertaking a number of related projects to secure a long-term water supply for the growing shire and adapt to the impacts of climate change. One of those projects is the raising of Clarrie Hall Dam.

In December 2015 Council resolved to undertake the planning and land acquisition for the raising of Clarrie Hall Dam. It is proposed to raise the wall of Clarrie Hall Dam by 8.5 metres to a height of 70 metres Australian Height Datum (AHD RL70) thereby increasing the size of the dam from 16,000 megalitres (ML) to approximately 42,300 ML to provide a secure

Council is undertaking a number of related projects to secure a long-term water supply for the growing shire and adapt to the impacts of climate change. One of those projects is the raising of Clarrie Hall Dam.

In December 2015 Council resolved to undertake the planning and land acquisition for the raising of Clarrie Hall Dam. It is proposed to raise the wall of Clarrie Hall Dam by 8.5 metres to a height of 70 metres Australian Height Datum (AHD RL70) thereby increasing the size of the dam from 16,000 megalitres (ML) to approximately 42,300 ML to provide a secure water supply for the Tweed until at least 2046.

An Environmental Impact Statement for the project is being undertaken by consultants Eco Logical Australia.

The EIS is expected to be completed by March 2021 and will be placed on exhibition for public comment.

EIS sub-consultant The Comms Team will engage with the community in February to help interested residents and others understand the EIS. That consultation will occur online on this site.

The online community consultation will be widely advertised and all registered participants of Your Say Tweed will be invited to participate. You can register to Stay Informed by following the link at the top right-hand of this page.

Once the EIS goes on public exhibition, anyone wishing to make a comment or submission on it will be directed to the Department of Planning Industry and Environment (DPIE) website. We will publish a link to that site here.

Context

Council is undertaking a number of related projects to secure a long-term water supply for the growing shire and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Through Council’s water-efficiency initiatives, the average Tweed resident has reduced their demand for water by more than 20 per cent in recent decades, allowing Council to service an increasing population without increasing the amount of water drawn from the Tweed River. Currently, Council is able to meet demand for water until approximately 2026.

To service the needs of the community after 2026, Council has resolved to undertake the planning and land acquisitions to raise Clarrie Hall Dam. This raising will treble the dam’s capacity and double its footprint, providing water security until at least 2046.

Further impacts of climate change are sea level rise, lower flows in the Tweed River and a forecast greater frequency of extreme weather events. This creates an increasing risk that Bray Park Weir will be overtopped by estuarine waters. That overtopping can result in salt water contamination of the Tweed District Water Supply. To address this risk, Council has resolved to accept the recommendation of a community project reference group to install a hinged barrier on the weir.

The third proposed water security project is to build a pipeline to connect the Tweed with the City of Gold Coast supply in south-east Queensland. The pipeline will provide an alternative water source in the event of a gross failure of the Tweed District Water Supply due to extreme drought or infrastructure failure. This pipeline would not negate the need to raise Clarrie Hall Dam.

To ensure Council’s approach to securing a long-term water supply for the Tweed continues to be appropriate, Council has been working with the community to review all its water strategies; being Demand Management, Water Augmentation and Drought Management Strategy. A report on this work is due to go to Council early in 2021.


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If you have a comment on this project, you can submit it here.
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

A preliminary study was done some years ago but due to the changes in the energy market and the capacity of the grid to take any electricity generated, the feasibility study needs to be revised. We have asked NSW Public Works Advisory to review the feasibility of hydro generation at Clarrie Hall Dam. - The Project Team.

BrendaH over 2 years ago

How about installing hydroelectricity like Grafton council

Jimbo over 2 years ago