Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse Upgrade

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About

The Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse was built in 1971 as a joint project between City of Gold Coast, Tweed Shire Council and the Commonwealth Department of Shipping and Transport to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the voyage along the east coast of Australia by Captain James Cook on the HMS Endeavour.

The building was extended in 1990 to accommodate the Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW service. Now, nearly 30 years on, the extension has a number of defects and the cost to maintain it fit for occupation is no longer sustainable.

Funds to renovate this heritage building, which


About

The Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse was built in 1971 as a joint project between City of Gold Coast, Tweed Shire Council and the Commonwealth Department of Shipping and Transport to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the voyage along the east coast of Australia by Captain James Cook on the HMS Endeavour.

The building was extended in 1990 to accommodate the Volunteer Marine Rescue NSW service. Now, nearly 30 years on, the extension has a number of defects and the cost to maintain it fit for occupation is no longer sustainable.

Funds to renovate this heritage building, which straddles the Queensland/NSW border, have been jointly provided by the City of Gold Coast and Tweed Shire Council via a grant from the NSW Government’s NSW Restart Program (a total of $3.2 million). Tweed Shire Council will manage the upgrade works.

The Point Danger site and Memorial building are busy pedestrian precincts, given the Coolangatta Centaur Memorial and Walk of Remembrance and viewing advantages afforded over Rainbow Bay and Duranbah beaches.

The site also has significant cultural heritage for Indigenous Australians.

Heritage consultants have advised that the aesthetics of the original border markers are to remain and the rebuild is to be low impact and consistent with the original border marker structure built in 1971.

The renovated building will retain the heritage aspects of the original building and essentially have the same look from the street. New public toilets and a gallery/kiosk space will be added to showcase the site’s history, including Aboriginal Cultural heritage storyboards and photographs.

Bundjalung/ Yugambeh Artist and Graphic Designer Christine Slabb from Fingal Head has been engaged to provide the indigenous storyboards and artworks for the gallery and landscaped environment.

Storyboards also will display narratives around the the Rescue Service and the European history of the area.

The gallery / kiosk will provide tabled seating both inside and on the viewing deck. The cafe will be leased via an open tender process. The successful tenderer will be required to stock and sell Marine Rescue fund-raising products. The cafe will operate seven days a week from 6am-8pm.










  • Captain Cook Memorial to sit atop new building

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    29 Jul 2020
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    Tuesday 26 February 2019

    Plans are afoot to rebuild the operations room and offices of the Marine Rescue NSW service at Point Danger on the border.

    The Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse was built in 1971 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the voyage along the east coast of Australia by Captain James Cook on the HMS Endeavour. The building was extended in 1990 to accommodate the Marine Rescue NSW service.

    The extension built in 1990 for Marine Rescue NSW has numerous structural defects and concrete cancer and the cost to maintain it fit for occupation is no longer sustainable.

    The existing border markers will remain and the new re-build of the Marine Rescue NSW component will provide public toilets and a gallery/kiosk space at this important pedestrian precinct, which attracts both residents and visitors alike for the views it provides over the Pacific and the historic memorial shipwreck walk on the Queensland side of the border.

    The $2.14 million project to demolish and rebuild the 28-year-old structure (Marine Rescue NSW component) beneath the Captain Cook Memorial and Lighthouse is being jointly funded by the City of Gold Coast and Tweed Shire Council, via grant funding of $973,000 from the New South Wales Government’s Restart NSW Regional Growth – Environment and Tourism Fund.

    Seven new parking spaces will be provided by turning the current parallel parking available on Boundary Street to angle-in parking.

    “Point Danger and the Captain Cook Lighthouse are iconic destinations for tourists but in the heart of the building Marine Rescue NSW is working to keep our waterways safe,” Member for Tweed Geoff Provest said.

    “I am delighted that the NSW Government, through its Restart NSW Fund, has partnered with Tweed and Gold Coast councils to deliver this vital project.”

    Tweed Director Community and Natural Resources Tracey Stinson said heritage consultants had advised that the aesthetics of the original border markers were to remain and the rebuild was to be low impact and consistent with the original border marker structure built in 1971.

    “But, the silver lining in this rebuild is that it provides us with the opportunity to improve the amenity of this popular vantage point for residents and visitors alike,” Ms Stinson said.

    The proposed design of the building will be discussed at a community meeting at the South Sea Islander Room at the Tweed Shire Council Administrative Centre, Brett Street, Tweed Heads, on Tuesday 5 March from 5.30-7pm. All are welcome to attend to speak with the architect and officers from both councils to provide their feedback on this project and ask questions. Alternatively, you can have your say by visiting https://www.yoursaytweed.com.au/Captain-Cook-Memorial

    Construction is due to start around July to August.