Tweed River Estuary Coastal Management Program

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Consultation has concluded

Council is preparing a new management plan for the Tweed River Estuary.

The Tweed River Estuary Coastal Management Program will provide recommendations for the future management of this important waterway, and will follow NSW government guidelines for coastal management.

The Tweed River Estuary is the tidal section of the river, a 35km stretch between the Bray Park Weir at Murwillumbah and the river mouth at Tweed Heads.

The Tweed River Estuary is many things to many people and community members will be invited to provide their feedback to help guide the plan’s priorities. The

Council is preparing a new management plan for the Tweed River Estuary.

The Tweed River Estuary Coastal Management Program will provide recommendations for the future management of this important waterway, and will follow NSW government guidelines for coastal management.

The Tweed River Estuary is the tidal section of the river, a 35km stretch between the Bray Park Weir at Murwillumbah and the river mouth at Tweed Heads.

The Tweed River Estuary is many things to many people and community members will be invited to provide their feedback to help guide the plan’s priorities. The scenic waterway and picturesque surrounds are used extensively for recreational activities and are extremely important to the local community.

Click here to share your comments and photos.

Click here to complete an online survey for the management plan before 7 November.

The Estuary retains a cultural connection for Aboriginal people and is a place for traditional cultural practices.

It is also highly valued as a commercial waterway and is integral to tourism and agricultural practices on the floodplain, contributing to the local economy.

It has a diversity of habitats for a wide variety of plants and animals and is home to a number of protected flora and fauna species, including estuarine vegetation (mangrove, saltmarsh and seagrass), shorebirds, raptors and fish species.

Maintaining the environmental health of the river is essential to sustain all its beneficial uses by the community.

It can be difficult to balance recreational, commercial and environmental priorities in a busy and popular waterway like the Tweed River, particularly in the face of population growth and rising sea levels. The key requirement of the management plan is to determine actions that can be implemented by Council, government agency stakeholders and the community to achieve the right balance between the many different uses and to protect nature, scenic and recreational values, livelihoods and cultural practices.

Keep an eye on this webpage for project updates. However, for further information, click here to find out how to contact a team member.

Tell your story

Tell us about the important issues for managing the Tweed River Estuary. Share your management ideas and observations about the Tweed River as a whole, or about particular locations in the river and its catchment.

Provide comments and upload photos about:

  • important locations or issues
  • what the Tweed River Estuary means to you
  • how you enjoy the Tweed River

You will also be able to participate in an online community survey in October.


Thank you for taking the time to share your ideas and priorities for the Tweed River Estuary.

Your input will help identify management issues and assist us to tailor management solutions and actions in the plan.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Tweed River - Partial Wilderness or Rubbish dump

    by PaddleHard, over 4 years ago

    I am now on my 8th trip to collect rubbish on the Cobaki foreshore with no end in site.

    Quite appalling when you first see how much has accumulated there.

    Such a pretty area but so degraded by careless people.

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Jack Evans Boat Harbour

    by tomrees, over 4 years ago

    During a twenty (20) year period after Seascape Apartments replaced their original rock wall due to erosion, beaches were nourished with sand from the harbour. This was regularly commissioned and paid for by Seascape owners.At the end of these 20 years and approximately 6 dredging episodes there was plentiful healthy seagrass , grass parkland gently sloping to sandy beaches , frequent dolphin visits indicating good fish stock and a regular turtle presence. 20 years of delight. Photograph attachedBeach nourishment was stopped on an order from State authorities in 2007.Since that time there has been massive park erosion, loss of at... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Terranora Neglect

    by strinker, over 4 years ago

    Tourist boat activities being conducted daily in the Terranora system are environmentally damaging and are not permitted elsewhere in Australia. Clients, numbering up to 100 are permitted to disembark onto extremely sensitive mud and sand flats, salt marsh and sea grass beds to experience "getting mud between your toes" - as advertised through the internet. NSW Fisheries unbelievably permits each tourist boat to carry between 30-40 yabbie pumps so that the tourists can experience the thrill of pumping yabbies - again not permitted anywhere else in Australia. Although the physical pumping of the yabbies on such a scale is damaging... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Reduce speed limit along Keith Crompton DR

    by Aglasson, over 4 years ago

    As a daily user of the Tweed / Terranora water ways I plead wth you to reduce the speed limit along this area before some one is killed.

    I have witnessed several close calls with tinnies and jetski's flyng through this area coming very close to swimmers along the foreshore.

    The 6 knot speed limit needs to be increased from Kennedy Dr Boat ramo right through to the entrance to the Tweed river.

    Water users know that the waterways are not patrolled after 4pm and in summer this is exploited with people towing in this area ducking in and out... Continue reading

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel