2016-2017 Consultation - Scenic Landscape Strategy

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Consultation has concluded


Council is producing a Scenic Landscape Strategy to identify and protect the Tweed's highly valued and important landscapes.

Tweed Shire's landscapes tell a rich and complex story of the region's evolution, its volcanic history, ecology, cultural and economic diversity.

Those landscapes include the southern hemisphere’s largest extinct shield volcano, five World Heritage-listed National Parks containing ancient Gondwana rainforests and dramatic mountain ranges and 37km of white sandy beaches and rocky headlands.

Nestled between them are 12 quaint rural villages, coastal creeks, mangrove estuaries, the Tweed River and its vast rich alluvial floodplain, covered by sugar cane.

This diversity of landscape characteristics makes the Tweed Valley a popular tourist destination, as well as an increasingly sought after place to live and work.

The Scenic Landscape Strategy will identify the landscapes' scenic values and implement measures to manage and protect them, particularly in the context of vulnerability to development pressure.



Council is producing a Scenic Landscape Strategy to identify and protect the Tweed's highly valued and important landscapes.

Tweed Shire's landscapes tell a rich and complex story of the region's evolution, its volcanic history, ecology, cultural and economic diversity.

Those landscapes include the southern hemisphere’s largest extinct shield volcano, five World Heritage-listed National Parks containing ancient Gondwana rainforests and dramatic mountain ranges and 37km of white sandy beaches and rocky headlands.

Nestled between them are 12 quaint rural villages, coastal creeks, mangrove estuaries, the Tweed River and its vast rich alluvial floodplain, covered by sugar cane.

This diversity of landscape characteristics makes the Tweed Valley a popular tourist destination, as well as an increasingly sought after place to live and work.

The Scenic Landscape Strategy will identify the landscapes' scenic values and implement measures to manage and protect them, particularly in the context of vulnerability to development pressure.


Tell your story

What are your favourite Tweed views and vantage points?

Upload your photographs or images and tell us why these locations are important to you.

Printed images can also be delivered to Council's offices in Murwillumbah and Tweed Heads.

Thank you for sharing your favourite scenic locations in the Tweed.

Your input is valuable in helping to create a Tweed Scenic Landscape Strategy that reflects the values of the community.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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    Scenic Tweed River

    by malcov, over 4 years ago

    One of our favourite pastimes is fishing in the Tweed River. We launch our tinny at Tumbulgum because the boat ramp and jetty are good here. We fish the deep holes and sand flats up river and down, and we usually catch a decent fish or two. The scenery of course is fantastic, from Mount Warning and the volcanic rim in the distance to watching the bird life along the river bank. The Tweed River is a special place for us.

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    And, from little things big things grow..

    by brucemoon, over 4 years ago

    Believe it or not, this is a picture of Boyd Family Park at West Tweed.

    Until recently, there were trees and grass. But, a stormwater upgrade meant Council had to remove the vegetation. In it's place is gravel.

    With a frontage onto busy Gollan Drive and now with a hard surface, the park makes an ideal site for car owners seeking to sell their vehicles.

    Who knows, one day Council might place line marking and charge prospective vendors to place their car.

    Facetiousness aside, Council has no policy regarding revegetation following engineering works.

    Ideally, Council will develop a policy whereby... Continue reading

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    OMG, why not another solution?

    by brucemoon, over 4 years ago

    We've all seen this sort of landscape. Ugly is the first reaction. Why not another way follows shortly.

    Protecting citizens from line damage caused by wind affected branches warrants such intervention. But, this 'solution' is only a recent approach.

    The saddest aspect is that each year, the electricity authorities team up with the tree loppers to not only remove any regrowth but also increase the 'size' of the intervention. What was once a small cut in the vegetation has now been increased to almost absurdity.

    Note the lack of vegetation on the other side of the street!

    Surely Council could... Continue reading

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    Bad landscape policy

    by brucemoon, over 4 years ago

    Here is a delightful landscape. But, it was once better.

    All the trees along this foreshore have been planted by adjacent residents and have matured wonderfully.

    Five years ago, there were 17 extra trees along this foreshore.

    For various reasons, the trees have been removed by Council. Several of the resident report at the time of removal they asked the Council officers to plant a replacement. They report Council officers advised they had no power to replace. A couple said they later asked the Council officers who manage the park to replace. The Council parks management staff say there is... Continue reading

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    The evolving urban landscape

    by brucemoon, over 4 years ago

    This is a frequently occurring landscape in the urban Tweed - once was scenically attracive is now becoming a wasteland.

    The attached picture shows the last remaining street tree on Kennedy Drive. It was one of many dozen along the road. As most know, the potholed goat track has received funding for a new surface. Council decided that the new kerbing meant the trees had to go.

    While the reasoning is contestable - there were other ways to address the new kerbing around the many dozens of mature trees - it is the decision not to replace the trees that... Continue reading

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    Frangela Drive Reserve of Old

    by Reserve, over 4 years ago

    In 2012 we moved to the once glorious Frangela Drive in Murwillumbah with spectacular views and a leash free dog park across the road. Unfortunately a Flying Fox roost has taken up residence and denuded the trees. One of the scenic parks in an urban space has now totally lost its magic.

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    Fingal Headland

    by Sue & Roger, almost 5 years ago

    The jewel of Tweed Shire Council Coastal Village location is the most sought out coastal headland by visitors from international to interstate and within our state frequented throughout the year.

    Due to the ever increasing social media, Fingal Headland has taken the world of awe and inspiration by storm noting the volume of sightings being; offshore birds, large schools of fish, dolphins and whale spotting.

    Easily accessible from Fingal Head Beach with; parking, toilet/shower block, and Holiday Park accommodation gives life to Fingal Head Coastal Village and this is obvious with the swell of visitors to the area.

    What a... Continue reading

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    Light through the darkness

    by robwise, almost 5 years ago

    I took this picture at Norries Headland (Cabarita). This picture is taking looking back at the aboriginal middens, while behind where I took the photo is the rock wall that was built by sand miners in the 1950s/1960s that protects the spit and forms the cove. This is a special place both historically and visually especially with the light filtering through the trees of a sunset.

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    The Caldera Rim

    by LouBear, almost 5 years ago

    Thank you for this opportunity to contribute.

    There are many vistas that are important in the area of scenic landscape value...I'm hoping others have already mentioned them...however one that is of major importance and could easily be overlooked is the integrity of the Caldera rim. This is especially so in the area of Terranora, Tomewin, Glengarrie, Piggabeeen and Carool...(the rim that is visible from the Murwillumbah Hospital, looking north-northeast).

    This rim is important for the following reasons:

    • It provides a physical, visual and landscape character boundary between the Tweed Valley and the Gold Coast
    • It provides visual landscape character for... Continue reading

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    Wilderness Beach

    by LouBear, almost 5 years ago

    My favourite Tweed view is of a scene taken from Hastings Point Headland looking south toward Pottsville Beach. Though locals are very aware of this beauty spot, tourists often drive past the turn off and never even realize what they have missed! This is one of my favourites because it is easily accessible by car so is the perfect place for elderly and people with disability who are not able to walk distances or stairs to access such a scene of such spectacular quality. This spot offers panoramic views in just about every direction. It's a perfect place to watch... Continue reading

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