Draft Rural Land Strategy

Defined by the caldera of Mount Warning/Wollumbin, rural Tweed and the Tweed valley provides postcard scenery, a landscape diverse in natural features, which supports a complex mix of landuses.

This diversity is reflected in the people who have moved here to pursue a life either earning a living from the land or to enjoy being part of a community nestled in a coastal valley connected to the major growth area of Southeast Queensland.

With this increasing diversity and demand for opportunities to be part of this rural area has come an escalation in conflict between landowners seeking to continue historical landuse practices, introduce alternative income generating
opportunities or to simply enjoy a rural lifestyle.


What does the Rural Land Strategy seek to achieve?

  • balance the sometimes competing desires of the rural community for security in
    operation of legitimate agricultural enterprises;
  • protect the environment and important extractive resources;
  • provide income generating opportunities without the need to work off farm;
  • provide greater housing opportunities without destroying the character of the Tweed which makes it such a sought after destination.

While much of the prime agricultural land in the Tweed is already protected, and the Tweed is recognised as a State
significant agricultural area, opportunities exist to diversify and add value to local produce through processing and
establishment of niche markets.

Tourism in rural Tweed has been experiencing significant growth and is seen as a means for a diversification of farming activities which take advantage of the environmental and agricultural features of the Tweed.


What is included in the Strategy?

To achieve these and other outcomes, the strategy has developed nine overarching policy directions which will deliver actions designed to ensure more sustainable use of rural land and less potential for conflict between landuses through better planning and management across all rural land.

To support the implementation of the strategy, key stakeholders, priorities and over 140 actions have been identified.

Defined by the caldera of Mount Warning/Wollumbin, rural Tweed and the Tweed valley provides postcard scenery, a landscape diverse in natural features, which supports a complex mix of landuses.

This diversity is reflected in the people who have moved here to pursue a life either earning a living from the land or to enjoy being part of a community nestled in a coastal valley connected to the major growth area of Southeast Queensland.

With this increasing diversity and demand for opportunities to be part of this rural area has come an escalation in conflict between landowners seeking to continue historical landuse practices, introduce alternative income generating
opportunities or to simply enjoy a rural lifestyle.


What does the Rural Land Strategy seek to achieve?

  • balance the sometimes competing desires of the rural community for security in
    operation of legitimate agricultural enterprises;
  • protect the environment and important extractive resources;
  • provide income generating opportunities without the need to work off farm;
  • provide greater housing opportunities without destroying the character of the Tweed which makes it such a sought after destination.

While much of the prime agricultural land in the Tweed is already protected, and the Tweed is recognised as a State
significant agricultural area, opportunities exist to diversify and add value to local produce through processing and
establishment of niche markets.

Tourism in rural Tweed has been experiencing significant growth and is seen as a means for a diversification of farming activities which take advantage of the environmental and agricultural features of the Tweed.


What is included in the Strategy?

To achieve these and other outcomes, the strategy has developed nine overarching policy directions which will deliver actions designed to ensure more sustainable use of rural land and less potential for conflict between landuses through better planning and management across all rural land.

To support the implementation of the strategy, key stakeholders, priorities and over 140 actions have been identified.